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The Labor Movement Celebrates National Hispanic Heritage Month

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Image: Mike Hall

According to the 2010 Census, 50.5 million people or 16% of the population are of Hispanic or Latino origin. This represents a significant increase from 2000, which registered the Hispanic population at 35.3 million or 13% of the total U.S. population.

Since its inception in 1972, LCLAA has remained a grassroots organization driven and directed by Latino labor leaders who understand the importance of unionization in helping workers secure rights and protections on the job, empowering them to become voices for justice and change in their communities. Here are some historic photos from LCLAA, including ones of César Chávez at the LCLAA Convention.

 National Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15) honors the contributions made and the important presence of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States and celebrates their heritage and culture. The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) is tweeting daily on milestones for Hispanic workers and Latino labor leaders. You also can find out more on its Facebook page.
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The AFL-CIO and LCLAA are co-hosting a reception Monday, Oct. 6, from 5–7:30 p.m. at 815 16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. for National Hispanic Heritage Month. If you’re interested in attending, RSVP to Sara Walling.

This blog originally appeared in AFL-CIO Blog on September 29, 2014. Reprinted with permission. http://www.aflcio.org/Blog/Other-News/The-Labor-Movement-Celebrates-National-Hispanic-Heritage-Month

About the Author: Mike Hall is a former West Virginia newspaper reporter, staff writer for the United Mine Workers Journal and managing editor of the Seafarers Log. He came to the AFL- CIO in 1989 and have written for several federation publications, focusing on legislation and politics, especially grassroots mobilization and workplace safety. When his collar was still blue, he carried union cards from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers, American Flint Glass Workers and Teamsters for jobs in a chemical plant, a mining equipment manufacturing plant and a warehouse. He also worked as roadie for a small-time country-rock band, sold my blood plasma and played an occasional game of poker to help pay the rent. You may have seen him at one of several hundred Grateful Dead shows. He was the one with longhair and the tie-dye. Still has the shirts, lost the hair.


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