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New study reveals just how little Uber drivers make

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2017 was a rough year for Uber. The ride-sharing giant was embroiled in a sexual harassment scandalIts CEO resigned. It admitted to underpaying its drivers in New York City, was fined $20 million for making false promises to its drivers, and was banned from one of its biggest overseas markets.

In response, the company has found itself in nearly full-time damage control mode and scrambling to win some positive publicity. Its latest community-orientated offering is the promising Uber Health, which allows medical facilities to book Uber rides for patients who don’t have access to reliable transportation. The program does not require the patient to have access to the Uber app or even a smartphone, according to TechCrunch.


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