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Latest Wrinkle in Overtime Debate Holds Up Spending Bill

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“It ain’t over until it’s over” appears to be the rallying cry of those in the U.S. Senate fighting to save American workers from overtime “reform” this year. Although the proposed regulations of the Department of Labor limiting overtime protections for millions of workers are slated to go into effect by March 31, 2004, the Senate has delayed action on the appropriations bill funding Labor and several other key departments in response to the Administration’s refusal to delay the implementation of the new regulations. The departments at issue are only funded until January 31, so someone will have to cry uncle soon. Let’s hope it’s not the American worker who pays the price, although by all indications, that may very well be the ultimate outcome.

Keep contacting your members of Congress, especially your Senators. This is such a key battle, and it isn’t over yet, so it’s very important that your legislators know where you stand.

Take Action Now: Protect Overtime Pay

More information about the Overtime Debate:

Editorials:

Overtime Grab/A Bad Idea That Won’t Die

Gaming Overtime

News Articles:

Senate Democrats Block Bill to Gut Overtime Rules

Chao Refuses To Delay New Overtime Rule

GOP Split on Overtime Pay

Overtime Pay Proposal Won’t Reduce Lawsuits, Key Lawmaker Says

Impact of Overtime Changes Still a Puzzle

U.S. Offers Tips on Avoiding Overtime Pay


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