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Our Programs Workplace Fairness Provides Information on Labor Unions and WAGE Act

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Workplace Fairness Provides Information on Labor Unions and WAGE Act

Organization has facts and resources on labor unions for all employees, employers, employment lawyers and workplace equality advocates

SILVER SPRING, Md. (Nov. 12, 2015) - Labor unions recently have been at the forefront of public debate because of their activism on behalf of presidential candidates and their key role in protecting wages, benefits and workplace protections for their members. In order to keep the public informed on labor laws and legislation, Workplace Fairness provides information on labor unions, retaliation for union activity/collective action and right to work laws.

Our Labor Unions section explains what a labor union is in full detail. We provide insightful answers to frequently asked questions and common scenarios for anyone who wants to learn more about unions, such as:

  • How does a union get started in the workplace?
  • What are the benefits of being a member of a union?
  • What is a collective bargaining agreement?
  • I work for a privately owned franchise, can my union bargain with its parent company?

In our Retaliation for Union Activity/Collective Action page, we educate you about forming a union in your workplace. We share valuable information on the legal ramifications of unifying your workplace through answering frequently asked questions and creating solutions to realistic scenarios, such as:

  • I'm interested in working towards organizing a union at work. Is it illegal for my employer to retaliate against me for my union activities?
  • Which employees are protected from retaliation under the law?
  • I've heard that when the boss starts to ask me questions about something that might get me in trouble, I have the right to have someone present. Is this true?
  • Am I entitled to Weingarten rights if I am not a member of a union?

Our Right to Work Laws page defines the term and educates the public about these laws, currently under debate in several states. Statewide legislation is covered through an interactive map in which the reader can simply click on their home state and find out the information they are seeking. There are also frequently asked questions that we provide answers to, such as:

  • Who is covered under 'Right-to-Work' laws?
  • Where can I expect to encounter 'Right-to-Work' laws in the workplace?
  • Are 'Right to Work' states "Anti-Union"?

For those who are interested in finding out more about labor-related news stories, take some time to review our Today's Workplace blog. For example, we are recently featuring a blog article by Shauna Barnaskas on proposed legislation strengthening the right to organize called Pass the WAGE Act Now. This recently introduced bill would reform the National Labor Relations Act to establish significant fines against employers who break the law, triple back pay awards and guarantee them regardless of a worker's immigration status, and allow victims of retaliation to seek damages in court. The article includes a discussion of the bill's provisions and tools for workers who wish to advocate for its passage.

For more information on a multitude of topics relating to workplace rights, laws, and legislation take a look at our website, filled with over 400 pages of substantive legal information, at www.workplacefairness.org.

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About Workplace Fairness

Workplace Fairness is a nonprofit organization that provides information, education and assistance to individual workers and their advocates nationwide and promotes public policies that advance employee rights.

Our goals are that workers and their advocates are educated about workplace rights and options for resolving workplace problems and those policymakers, members of the business community and the public at large view the fair treatment of workers as both good business practice and sound public policy.

Workplace Fairness works toward these goals by:

  • Making comprehensive information about workers' rights free of legal jargon readily available to workers and to advocates and organizations that assist workers;
  • Providing resources to support the work of legal services organizations, community-based organizations, law schools and private attorneys that provide free legal information and services to low-income workers;
  • Presenting the employee perspective in publications, policy debates & public discussion.

The award-winning Workplace Fairness website, www.workplacefairness.org, has newly updated information throughout the site, as part of the Web's most comprehensive resource educating workers about their legal rights in the workplace.

Media Contact:
Paula Brantner

Executive Director